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UCAT ANZ Score Advice: What Should You Do Now?

UCAT-ANZ-SCORES

 

With UCAT summary test statistics released, students now have more information about how their score compares to other UCAT candidates. This blog will help you interpret your score and provide advice on what you should do now.

You can convert your UCAT score into a UCAT percentile using MedEntry’s UCAT score-percentile calculator, available here: https://www.medentry.edu.au/ucat-score-percentile-calculator

Scores above 2800

Interpretation

Students scoring above 2800, in general, have a good chance of receiving an interview offer, provided they meet the minimum required ATAR for the particular university and course. A score of 2830 equates to 90th percentile, which is generally required at most universities for a standard medical place. However, UCAT scores are only one element of the medical entry process. Medical interviews are also very important. At many universities (including Adelaide, Monash, UNSW and UWA), medical interviews are worth 30-40% of the selection criteria! At JCU, WSU and Newcastle, medical interviews are worth even more.

Recommendations

With your score, you have a good chance of obtaining an interview offer. We suggest that you do the following:

  1. Apply to as many universities and medical courses as possible. Applying to multiple universities in various locations across the country will give you the best chance of obtaining an interview offer. Furthermore, given interviews are subjective by nature, there is no guarantee of an offer at any particular university. Attending multiple interviews will increase your chances of securing a place in medical school. Note that you will need to apply separately to each state-based admissions centre (VTAC, UAC, QTAC, SATAC, TISC etc.) and applications usually close in late September.
  2. Start thinking about interviews. Medical interviews are a vital criterion for entry into medical school, and in many cases are as important, if not more important, than UCAT and academic performance. Unfortunately, most students do not take into account how important interviews are, and many do no preparation at all, leading to a missed place in medical school. Performing well in your interview will significantly increase your chances of securing your place in medicine. Furthermore, the skills required to succeed in a medical interview cannot be developed overnight – they should be developed over a period of weeks to months. Do not wait until the end of the academic year to start preparing! All students have access to the MedEntry interview guide, and MedEntry also offers medical interview training.
  3. Try to achieve the highest possible ATAR. The higher your ATAR, the greater your chance of securing a medical place at your preferred university. With a high ATAR, high UCAT score and excellent interview performance, you may even receive a scholarship!

 

Scores between 2500 and 2800

Interpretation

Students scoring in this range may receive an interview offer, particularly if they are in the upper part of this range (2700+) and are rural students, local students, students applying for dentistry, or students who expect to receive a very high ATAR. Universities differ in their emphasis on UCAT, and use UCAT in various ways. Further details can be found in this blog: https://www.medentry.edu.au/ucat/entry/how-will-medical-schools-use-ucat

Recommendations

Given your score may or may not be sufficient to obtain an interview offer, we suggest the following:

  1. Apply to as many universities and medical courses as possible. Applying to multiple universities in various locations across the country will give you the best chance of obtaining an interview offer. Furthermore, given interviews are subjective by nature, there is no guarantee of an offer at any particular university. Attending multiple interviews will increase your chances of securing a medical school place. Note that you will need to apply separately to each state-based admissions centre (VTAC, UAC, QTAC, SATAC, TISC etc.) and applications usually close in late September.
  2. Trying to achieve the highest possible ATAR. In general, the higher your ATAR, the lower the required UCAT score to obtain an interview offer. It is therefore important for you to maximise your ATAR to improve your chances of obtaining an interview offer.
  3. Start thinking about interviews. At many universities (including Adelaide, Monash, UNSW and UWA), medical interviews are worth 30-40% of the selection criteria! At JCU, WSU and Newcastle, medical interviews are worth even more. Most students do not consider the importance of interviews, and many do no preparation at all, leading to a missed place. Performing well in your interview will significantly increase your chances of securing a place in medicine. Furthermore, the skills required to succeed cannot be developed overnight – they should be developed over a period of weeks to months. Do not wait until the end of the academic year to start preparing! All students have access to the MedEntry interview guide, and MedEntry also offers medical interview training.

 

Scores less than 2500

Interpretation

Students scoring less than 2500 have, in general, scored lower than average among all students sitting UCAT. The mean (average) UCAT ANZ 2019 score was 2480, which equates to the 50th percentile. Students scoring less than 2500 are unlikely to receive an offer for a medical interview at universities which require UCAT.  Note that this does not mean such students are lower than average in ability! Remember that students sitting UCAT are those aiming for medicine and dentistry, and have a high level of ability. This is a unique and tough cohort of students that you are competing against.

Recommendations

Given your score may fall short of what universities are looking for, it is best to plan ahead. We suggest:

  1. Applying for universities which do not require UCAT for entry. These include James Cook University (which uses academic results and a written statement – applications close in late September) and Bond University (which uses academic results, a written statement and a psychometric test). MedEntry offers a written application review service and medical interview training.
  2. Trying to achieve the highest possible ATAR. There are some universities that make offers to studnts with very high ATARs, even if they do not receive high UCAT scores. An example of this would be the direct entry pathway into medicine at the University of Sydney. If you are likely to receive a very high ATAR, it would be worthwhile considering interview preparation, in case you receive an offer.
  3. Consider re-sitting UCAT. Getting into medicine is a difficult and competitive process. If you do not get into medicine on your first attempt, you can repeat UCAT. You can either take a gap year (in which you will still be considered a school leaver) or start a degree and resit UCAT (note that you will then be considered a ‘non-standard applicant’, and not all universities will accept you). If you are considering repeating UCAT, it is best to start your preparation early.
  4. Consider Plan B. It is important to consider other options in the event you do not get into medicine or dentistry. What other degrees or careers are you interested in? If you have your heart set on medicine and do not wish to resit UCAT, another option is graduate entry medicine, via the GAMSAT pathway.

Further information regarding UCAT scores can be found at:

https://www.medentry.edu.au/ucat/entry/how-will-medical-schools-use-ucat

https://www.medentry.edu.au/ucat/entry/how-will-universities-use-ucat-anz-scores

We wish you the best of luck for the coming months!

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