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Edward Boyapati

Dr Edward is an academic with over thirty years of experience teaching in Australian universities. He has published several articles on educational research and has delivered numerous papers/keynote addresses at several International Teaching and Learning Conferences. He has received numerous awards for excellence in teaching. He has a long-standing interest in Psychometric measurement and spent time at educational research institutes such as the ETS (Princeton, USA) and NFER (Slough, UK). Ed also lectured at several universities in various countries such as Brazil, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, USA and UK. He has been a Consultant and an Expert Witness for several organisations.


Dr Edward has been training students for tests such as the UMAT for over two decades. Among his successful students include his own children, both of whom were offered places in all medical schools and held Monash Scholarships for Exceptional Achievement (awarded to the best incoming student each year). They are not only the youngest doctors to be accepted into the training programs of the most competitive of medical specialties, but have also won medals for obtaining the top score in the country in the specialist training theory and clinical exams held by the Royal Colleges (eg, see RACP News, Vol 32, No 2, April 2012, p 27). His daughter won an unprecedented three medals in the nationwide Fellowship exams ('The Mole' ACD Issue 102, Spring 2014, p 8, 18; Health Link, Dec 2014 Issue 19, p 14). Ed will aim to pass on to you the advice he gave his children which contributed to their unparalleled success. Ed comes from a family of 26 doctors.


Dr Edward is a member of International Society for Intelligence Research, International Test Commission and an invited member of numerous professional organisations related to psychometric/educational/aptitude & personality testing. He is also the Practice Manager of a Medical Centre and has a wide knowledge of the health profession and health-related issues. 

In life, we are told that ‘practice makes perfect’. The more you practice a particular skill, whether it be playing the piano, swimming or writing essays, the better you become at it. So, in theory, it should be the same in UMAT – the more practice questions you do, the better you are at UMAT – right? Not necessarily. Just like any skill, to do well in UMAT you first need a basic understanding of what it is, what it tests and how to approach the various types of questions. Without this understanding, you may still be able to improve by...
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Be under no illusions: the UMAT is the single hardest and most important test you will ever sit. This is a scary (and for some maybe terrifying) thought. So what can you do to make it less daunting? The answer may seem counter-intuitive: the best way to make UMAT seem do-able is to face it over, and over, and over again. How? By completing high quality, full length trial exams under timed conditions. UMAT is scary because it is so different to any other test you have done in school – it is much harder, much longer and much more time-pressured,...
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Some students who are preparing for UMAT wonder if they should get a private tutor for UMAT or attend weekly UMAT classes. Often this is because that is what they are used to doing in high school. But UMAT is very different to school and therefore requires a different approach. Here we suggest a much more effective (and much cheaper) way of preparing for UMAT: group study. The benefits of group study are well known: it is more social, more enjoyable and more effective, particularly for tests such as UMAT.  Extensive pegagogical research has shown that group study is far more...
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A common question that aspiring medical students ask is whether they should combine their medical degree with another degree, such as arts or music. It is important to think carefully about this. You will be spending additional 3–4 years of your life and as well as a lot of money if you pursue a double degree. Will a degree such as English, history, philosophy, music or literature actually benefit you?Some argue that these degrees are worthwhile, may point to all the things you can learn, and perhaps even point out a few successful people that achieved a lot with such degrees....
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You may have heard that stress negatively impacts on performance. You may have been told that if you are too stressed in the lead up to an important exam such as UMAT, you won’t do well. You may have been advised to look for ways to relieve your stress. While this may be true, in some cases trying to get rid of stress can actually cause you to become more stressed. A different approach, which might sound crazy at first, is to embrace your stress. The following three strategies will not only help you manage stress, but will also boost your...
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UMAT is probably the hardest test you will ever have to sit. Many students, especially those who do not prepare, are shocked by the difficulty of UMAT. Some who do prepare become disillusioned. So why is UMAT so hard? And what can you do about it? Read on!  1. UMAT is very different to every other type of test you have sat Why?  School and university exams test your knowledge and your ability to apply that knowledge. UMAT is not a test of knowledge; it is a test of your generic skills. You most likely have never sat a test of...
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There are a wealth of resources available to you on the LMS. You can check your progress by visiting the Check Progress page, either by clicking on the icon on the homepage of the LMS or by clicking on the icon next to the ‘Check’ section under UMAT resources:    When you arrive on the Check Progress page, you can view your progress with the practice exams or drills by clicking on the relevant tab:   Practice exams You will see a drop down list of your UMAT exams and information about their completion. Click on the drop-down arrow to see...
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Is your son or daughter interested in becoming a doctor? Do you want to give them the best chance to succeed? Dr Edward Boyapati discusses how you, as a parent, can assist your child to achieve their goal.  Dr Edward Boyapati is the Principal Lecturer for MedEntry, Australia’s most trusted UMAT Educational Institution. He is also the father of two incredibly successful children, Ray and Ann. Both obtained 100th percentile in UMAT, were offered places to study medicine at all universities across Australia, won full scholarships to study medicine, were successful in entering highly competitive specialties (Gastroenterology and Dermatology) and achieved...
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ATTENTION PARENTS: 5 WAYS TO HELP YOUR SON OR DAUGHTER IN THE LEAD UP TO UMAT Your final year of schooling is a stressful time. Add in UMAT and the pressures of getting into medicine, and stress levels can rapidly sky rocket. As a parent it is easy to succumb to feelings of powerless as you watch your son or daughter struggle to prepare for such an important and difficult exam. However, there are many things you can do to boost their performance and have a positive impact on their wellbeing.  Provide a sound working environment UMAT is a three-hour test...
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For twenty years since UMAT has been in existence, the UMAT was divided into three, separately timed sections: • Section 1: Logical Reasoning and Problem Solving • Section 2: Understanding People • Section 3: Non-Verbal Reasoning  In 2013, there was a significant change to the structure of UMAT. Now UMAT is presented as a single three-hour exam with 134 questions. It still consists of the three broad types of questions outlined above (now known as ‘constructs’), but instead of them being divided into sections, the questions from each construct are jumbled up. For example, the first unit you encounter may be...
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Many students who have scored 100th percentile in the UMAT have said that preparing for UMAT is like preparing for a marathon. There are many similarities: they both require significant motivation, consistent practice over a period of time and a clear head under pressure. Not to mention that for many people both a marathon and the UMAT are the hardest challenges they have faced so far in their lifetime. So what can we learn from marathon runners that will help us prepare for the UMAT? Step 1: Develop muscle In the UMAT you will have a limited amount of time to...
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Eat a live frog first thing in the morning and nothing worse will happen to you the rest of the day. – Mark Twain Brian Tracy’s 5 minute YouTube video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FKOMTZ7PPLg discusses a time management strategy that has changed many people’s lives (including mine!). It discusses time management in the context of the workplace, but the strategy is applicable to UMAT and high school/university study too. This blog summarises the key points.  As Mark Twain said, if the first thing you do in the morning is to eat a live frog, you’ll have the satisfaction of knowing that’s probably the worst thing...
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Scenario: Vaccinations are an important part of an individual’s immunity and keeping a community safe from disease. It is ideal that all children get immunized at the appropriate age to prevent contraction of preventable diseases. However, there are some in Australia that oppose vaccination. They argue the harm of vaccinations outweigh the benefits, and the lack of freedom of choice in how their children should be raised. Their claims often have no scientific basis, and create unnecessary fear in society. You are on the advisory board of the Australian Government looking to change the laws on how to deal with improving...
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What is discrimination? Discrimination can be defined as unwarranted unfavourable treatment towards an individual or groups of individual based on their actual or perceived membership in a certain group or social category. Such treatment is usually in a way that is worse than the way people are usually treated. Discrimination could be based on someone’s gender, race, location, or socio-economic basis, etc. Discrimination is against the law under the Discrimination Act 1991 (ACT), Anti-Discrimination Act 1977 (NSW), Anti-Discrimination Act 1996 (NT), Anti-Discrimination Act 1991 (QLD), Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (SA), Anti-Discrimination Act 1998 (TAS), Equal Opportunity Act 1995 (Vic) and Equal...
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In the game of UMAT practice, consistency beats brilliance. It is important that we not wait until we have lots of motivation before we start practicing. Good UMAT skills come about in the context of practicing in a more routine and ordinary manner, rather than sporadic bursts of insight. The goal should be gaining meaningful and valuable UMAT skills every time you practice. Expecting anything more may create too much pressure and lead to debilitating blocks and limitations. To be successful at the UMAT, you need to develop UMAT practice as a practice or discipline. UMAT = Meditation? In this sense,...
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Does patient confidentiality always prevail? Scenario:  You have been working at Pinehills Prison and Corrections Centre as the in-house physician for approximately six months. Being a physician in a prison has required you to slowly build a sense of trust with the inmates (many of whom suffer from serious psychological illness) over a long period of time. The process has been arduous and often emotionally draining, but you finally feel like you are building a positive rapport with the some of the inmates and have seen a steady improvement in both their physical and mental health as a result of your ongoing appointments....
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Medical interviews Congratulations to those who got a medical interview. It is a good idea to prepare for the interview. You may need to have examples of role models during the interviews. If you need some some inspiration for finding your role model, we have found some inspiring doctors below. These short biographies of their notable work will be great for medical interviews.  Remember, MedEntry offers great medical interview training packages and medical interview guide.  Frank Macfarlane Burnet An Australian virologist best known for his contributions to immunology. He won the Nobel Prize in 1960 for predicting acquired immune tolerance and was best...
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To be mentally tough is to resist the urge to give up in the face of failure, to maintain focus and determination in pursuit of your UMAT goals, and to emerge from adversity even stronger than before. Everyone can benefit from strengthening their resilience skills.  Mental toughness comes from thinking like an optimist. People who don’t give up have a habit of interpreting setbacks as temporary, local and changeable. When in the face of adversity, try to say to yourself, “It’s going away quickly; it’s just this one situation, and I can do something about it.” Analyze your beliefs and emotions...
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Stereotype threat can affect the way students perform in the UMAT.  Some students are vulnerable to “stereotype threat.” This is being aware the group they belong to is often stereotyped as intellectually inferior. The fear of confirming the stereotype by doing poorly on a test actually creates an anxiety. It is this anxiety that poorly affects their performance on a test, creating a self-fulfilling prophecy.  Consider this study conducted at Stanford:  A group of undergraduates — some athletes and some not — was given a test made up of questions from the Graduate Record Examination (G.R.E.), the admissions test for graduate...
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Are you having a hard time motivating yourself to study for the UMAT? The tools we often reach for when we need to get ourselves moving are carrots (rewarding ourselves once a tough job is done) or sticks (depriving ourselves of something we want if we fail to do it). These are "extrinsic rewards". But such extrinsic rewards and punishments are not as effective as intrinsic ones. Intrinsic rewards come from your own person - you believe that if you do a certain thing, it will make you a better, more knowledgable person.  Here, six ways to find the intrinsic interest in studying for the...
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